The Flower Girls

Twisted.

It is the one word that keeps echoing in my mind when I think about this mind-boggling story by Alice Clark-Platts. It starts out much like any other thriller, introduces the plot to us, delves into the minds of the suspects and teases us with the flashbacks that are interwoven in the present-day narrative. But unlike the usual murder mystery, the plot of which is driven by the need to know who the culprit is, The Flower Girls opens with two girls being caught for a crime they supposedly committed. And in executing the plot this way, the author ensnares us. The need to know the rationale that propelled the perpetrators weighs heavily on our minds and so, I just couldn’t set this book down!

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Two sisters, of age 10 years and 6 years respectively, get caught for the abduction and murder of a two-year old child. Laurel Bowman, the elder one, faces years of imprisonment and estrangement. But since Rosie was considered too young to be held responsible for such a crime, she escapes doing time and is given a new identity along with her parents, so that they may relocate. Now, nineteen years later, another case of a missing child threatens to upturn the lives of the Bowmans.

One third into the book and the main plot of the novel appeared to have been wrapped up, or so I kept thinking. But it was the determination of Detective Hillier that kept me on my toes, because she refused to be content with how the kid’s disappearance was solved. In fact, the novel would’ve been really dull if the present day mystery had not been tied up to the case of the Flower Girls.

You should be aware that it deals with some sensitive topics like child abuse, kidnapping and torture. So keep that in mind before you start reading. The chapters are really short and that helps us transition from one scene to another; thereby, keeping up the pace of the novel. Alice Clark-Platts’ writing style in this one is marked by long sentences and subtle indications that really drive you insane with anticipation. I particularly enjoyed reading the chapters that were set in the 90s because they had such a peculiar tone to them, almost creepy and disturbing. But it was the last two chapters that left me stunned beyond doubt!

There are quite a few characters in this book, many of whom play fleeting yet essential roles. I didn’t like Laurel and Rosie’s parents. They could’ve dealt with the whole thing in a much better manner, instead of abandoning their daughter. The representation of media, although true, is also something that irked me. In between, there comes a point where the pace of the book slows down and you begin to wonder what’s going to happen now. But rest assured that the end is worth the wait. It’ll likely knock you off your feet (that is if you haven’t guessed it already). I had a feeling about what really transpired but it made no sense, so I didn’t bank on that theory and allowed myself to be persuaded otherwise.

The fact that I sat all day and finished this book speaks volumes about how compelling it is. And so, I urge you to read it. While it is not going to be featured on my favorite books of all time list, this is a story you shouldn’t pass up reading.

★ ★ ★ .75

Thank you Bloomsbury India for sending me a copy of this book in exchange of an honest review.

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The Peshwa: War of the Deceivers

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Tell me that a 400+ paged novel about politics, war and strategy will have me rooted to the spot for over 6 hours and I’d probably have laughed in your face. Well, I’d have done exactly that before having read The Peshwa: War of the Deceivers by Ram Sivasankaran. Set against the backdrop of the Mughal Empire and the increasing agitation of the Marathas against the Mughals, this second installment in the Peshwa series begins with a sense of alarm as someone from the royal family meets an unfortunate end. It then picks up the pace, touching upon the conquests of Peshwa Bajirao Bhat as he tries to weed out the Mughals from his homeland. However, a secret group of assassins, known as the Scorpions, continue to pose a serious threat, ravaging villagers and disrupting Rao’s attempts to bring the Emperor to his knees. It falls on him to capture these elusive hitmen before they get to his family and lay waste to the Maratha Empire.

Ram Sivasankaran’s writing equips you with the tools for imagining exactly what he is trying to convey. I was glad to see that it didn’t focus too much on nature imageries, rather chose to spend all its powers of persuasion in delivering crisp scenes, with an equal amount of dialogue and description of the happenings. The cruelty with which the assassins and tyrants dealt a blow to the Marathas and Sikhs is absolutely horrendous. But the author had the good sense to depict it in a subtle manner and not get into the gory details that would’ve been entirely too harsh on young, impressionable minds.

Interspersed throughout the narrative are several words in Hindi, Marathi and Sanskrit – all of which have been explained in the glossary. Something that aided in making this book extremely gripping is the fact that each of the chapters (sometimes the subsections too) followed different storylines. So you could be reading about Bajirao or Emperor Muhammad Shah or Kashibai or Nizam Ul Mulk or any of the several other characters that are featured in this adventurous, action-packed story. While the illustrations that intervene the writing are simple, they reinforce what is being told and so were a welcome distraction.

Oscillating between pride at the depicted valor of some heroic historical figures and exhilaration at the pace with which the plot of the novel advanced, I couldn’t believe how genius some of the plot points were. It truly takes a mastermind to weave such intricate designs into a tapestry borrowed from Indian history. Speaking of history, I’m not sure to what extent some aspects of this novel are true and where exactly the author’s imagination steps in to add some seasoning. But collectively, this was such an impactful and awe-inspiring account. I took a peek at the Goodreads page and was so disheartened to see that a third book in the series hasn’t been announced yet. But be sure that the moment it is out in the market, I’m going to bring home a copy. Meanwhile, you should pick up The Peshwa: War of the Deceivers for a gala time. Take my word for it, you won’t be disappointed!

Thank you Writers Melon and Westland Books for sending me a copy of this book in exchange of an honest review.

★ ★ ★ ★.5

Book Review — Cold Truth by Nikhil Pradhan

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Sakshi Prakash is a 10-year-old girl who goes missing from East Delhi. While the police are making zilch efforts to uncover the mystery behind her disappearance, a journalist follows the trails left behind by other such possible child kidnappings, and ends up unveiling an international conspiracy that’ll take the world by storm. Written in an epistolary format, Cold Truth packs a punch with its emphasis on corruption and the possibilities of the unknown.


While I’m always ready to devour a good mystery novel, it soon became apparent that Cold Truth was not what it looked like. It’s not a basic suspense fiction. The search for Sakshi spirals out and we come to realize how other cases, governments and agencies are involved in covering up certain life-altering mistakes. Amidst themes of conspiracy, experiments and the pursuit of truth, the plot execution has been managed splendidly. I would give brownie points to the author for thinking of such an intriguing plot.

As for the writing style and language, I’d say this book is apt for intermediate readers. Conveyed through chats, newspaper articles, voice transcripts, official documents and other different elements, the story is pieced together by the journalist’s narration. There are portions where the writing makes use of some medical jargon, but apart from that, the style is quite straightforward. If you’re not used to reading many jaw-dropping books, you should prepare yourself for the insane amounts of gaping-mouth scenarios that are inevitable once you begin reading this novel of Nikhil Pradhan’s. It is simply mind-blowing!

One issue I have with the book is that at times, I felt that the narrative would digress from the focal point of the scene/the chapter. The unnecessary bits could’ve been done away with. But on the whole, it is a spellbinding tome of 200 odd pages, which I finished in a sitting. This is one of those books (right up my alley!) that I’m not going to forget anytime soon. So highly recommend it!

Rating – 4.5 out of 5 stars

What do you get out of it? An unputdownable thriller that not only explores certain serious themes but also has a peculiar ending.

Thank you HarperCollins India for sending me a copy of this book in exchange of an honest review.